Below are descriptions of the tracks from the CD's above.

Sa Ta Na Ma CD cover

Sa Ta Na Ma

74:36

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Featuring two of the most used Kundalini Mantras: 'Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo' and 'Sa Ta Na Ma' each followed by two meditative flute pieces on the CD. There are two versions of the 'Sa Ta Na Ma' Mantra – 11 and 31 minutes long. I was certified in Kundalini Yoga in 1998 and during the training we were challenged to do these two mantras for 40 days. If we missed a day we would have to start the count over. The Sa Ta Na Ma meditation has certain time lengths for singing the Mantra, then whispering, then mentally reciting it, returning to whispering and then singing it again to finish. While I was practicing the Mantra I got frustrated and felt distracted trying to keep track of the time for each section, so I decided to make a sequence that would change the sound at the right times as a cue. I made cassettes (remember them?) for the rest of the class and gave them out if people were interested. They all really loved having the cues from the sound changing and the rhythms and instruments I used to accompany the Mantra so I kept refining the sequence when I had the inspiration. Later, I was honored to have my Kundalini Instructor Deva Kaur Khalsa come to the studio and sing with me on the final recorded version you will hear. Like my CD 'bamboo dynasty' I took out a lot of the synth from the sequence and replaced those parts with live instruments.

Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo 3:17

In Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan's 3HO, 'Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo' is one of the most powerful mantras. It is used to tune in to your higher self - usually before meditation. 'Ong' - the Creator, 'Namo' - a reverent greeting, 'Guru' - one who enlightens, and 'Dev' - non-physical. The phrase recognizes God, Guru, and the teacher within. The version on Sa Ta Na Ma does not have Amit Chaterjee on vocals, as the ‘Svadharma’ CD does. Amit also added his talents on Sitar that day for both versions.

Sa Ta Na Ma 11:38 & 31:55 (two versions)

The Sa Ta Na Ma meditation is a great catalyst for change in your life. 'Sa' - all that ever was, 'Ta - creativity, 'Na' - Destruction, and ‘Ma’– Regeneration, all four parts together representing the cycle of life. In Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan's 3HO, Sa Ta Na Ma is one of the most powerful mantras, often preceded by Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo (above). There is both an 11 and 31 minute version of Sa Ta Na Ma on the CD. There is a lot to do during this meditation - in turn singing, whispering, and mentally reciting the mantra while using a mudra (positioning of the hand). Full instructions are included with the CD and both meditations are followed by bamboo flute pieces (Dhyana and Egyptian Moon above) to allow the continuation of the meditative state.

Dhyana 8:47

Dhyana is one of the eight limbs of Yoga meaning 'meditation'. It uses a one-note drone and I improvised the piece based on the sound of a Major tonic chord and a IV minor chord.

Egyptian Moon 14:04

I played the Egyptian bamboo flute and used a harmonica for the drone, approximating a harmonium for this flute meditation.

Svadharma CD cover

Svadharma

54:26

Exploring the mix of Jazz, Flamenco, and Funk or Blues, with music and instruments from China, Japan, India, Ireland, Africa, and the Caribbean. Woodwinds including Soprano, Tenor, and Baritone Saxophones, Bamboo Flutes from India and China, percussion from Africa, South America, and Asia, mixed with vocals, drum sets, acoustic piano, acoustic bass, violin.

I had a friend that financed what I call the “original Yellow Bell recordings” which consisted of a totally under rehearsed group of the best musicians I knew. We spent two hours placing mics for the two full drum sets, Acoustic and Electric bassists, and two percussionists. Writing this I realize it sounds a little like Noah’s Ark! We also had acoustic grand piano and myself on various woodwinds. We did the original sessions live with this group and then I added some instrumental like vocals later. Half of this CD including Bell Peace, Yellow Bell Pop, Sea Gospel, Dharana, Dhyana, and Reprise (Dharana) were all products of these sessions.

These well-recorded, atmospheric world beat grooves are sure to appeal to listeners who like the notion of raga-hard bop hybrids like 'Bop-Ras' and 'Dharana' or the fusion of Celtic and Chinese motifs in 'Dizi Gigue'

[David Lewis, Cadence Magazine]

Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo 3:16

Originally released on the 'Sa Ta Na Ma' CD. Amit Chaterjee sent tingles up our spines when he improvised the lead vocal in the studio. He also added his talents on Sitar that day. In Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan's 3HO, 'Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo' is one of the most powerful mantras. It is used to tune in to your higher self - usually before meditation. 'Ong' - the Creator, 'Namo' - a reverent greeting, 'Guru' - one who enlightens, and 'Dev' - non-physical. The phrase recognizes God, Guru, and the teacher within.

Bop-Ras 4:53

Conceived as a Flamenco piece to feature the percussive footwork of that art form. The piece had to be re-thought when the lead dancer got lost on the highway during a rainstorm. She never showed up the night of the recording and then decided to drop out of the project. The other dancer I regularly worked with was out of town for the near future so I decided to compose a melody for Bansuri (Indian bamboo flute) and double it with bowed Acoustic Bass. Adding the funky Baritone Sax part also happened after we had begun the recording of the tune.

Bell Peace 9:12

Recorded at one of the original Yellow Bell sessions, this tune was recorded live with an 8-piece ensemble - two drum sets, two percussionists (one doubling on didgeridoos), two bassists (acoustic and electric), acoustic piano, and soprano sax. The melodies of the piece are built on a diminished scale, and were sketched out the day of the session and then doubled later with vocals.

Dizi Gigue 5:45

One of the more composed pieces on the CD, I play the Dizi (Chinese Bamboo Flute); Nicole Yarling played violin on the melody and scatted a great vocal solo. I conceived the melody as an Irish Gigue in a major scale and used a rhythm of 14/4 divided in half into two groups of seven, and then further sub-dividing it into 4-3-3-4. I think of this as a palindromic meter, and continue to enjoy playing this sort of rhythm. I first used this concept with this time signature in 'Botswana Waltz' on the 'Yellow Bell / bamboo dynasty' CD.

Yellow Bell Pop 1:17

Another piece from the original Yellow Bell sessions. When I originally composed this piece, this was the intro played on Alto flute while breathing lightly and popping the keys. The full melody with chord changes has still not been recorded.

Sea Gospel 4:45

Also from the original Yellow Bell sessions, I play Tenor Sax with bass and drums. This is probably the closest to a straight-ahead tune, but no chordal instruments, allowing me a lot more freedom.

‘Five’ 4:12

Percussionist Michael Moses and I had found this sonority using the Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute), the Wah-Wah bells, and his double Ocarina on the 'Riversticks / Ferryman's Release' CD. I wanted a chance to develop that combination of sounds and the day of the Yellow bell session Michael proposed doing something in 5/4, hence the title of the piece.

Dharana 6:34

Another piece from the first recording sessions, Dharana is one of the eight limbs of Yoga meaning 'one pointed concentration'. This is another recording from the original Yellow Bell sessions - the basic idea was improvised on a live 'Free Jazz' gig I did one night. Based on a 6-note scale using two major triads a half step apart (G and F concert), for a while I called this tune 'six-note'. Later, a minor seventh (E) was added because it seemed to need it. At the recording session I tried to give the players in the large ensemble 'roles' but not complete written parts. Amit Chaterjee overdubbed a great Sitar part for us much later.

Dhyana 8:49

Dhyana is one of the eight limbs of Yoga meaning 'meditation'. It uses a one-note drone and I improvised the piece based on the sound of a Major tonic chord and a IV minor chord.

Bar-Bar-A 4:32

I played two tabla drums instead of the usual pair of Tabla and Bayan, and used some large Indian Brass bells, scraping and striking them to round out the percussion sound. The melody on bamboo flute had been improvised one night at a session and then developed later. Amit Chaterjee added his talents on Sitar.

Reprise (Dharana) 1:48

Another of the original sessions this was almost an afterthought at the end of the second night of recording. With a smaller group and electric bass we did a short take of the coda from the original 'Dharana'.

Nile Eyes 4:54

This tune was from a session drummer Abbey Rader led with his group. With no overdubs I played the Tenor and Soprano Saxes at the same time. Thanks for letting me include it on 'Svadahrma', Abbey.

Rain Trance CD cover

Rain Trance

66:05

One of the three CDs in the Yellow Bell Water Trilogy (including ‘Lake Melva Meditation’ and soon to be released ‘Ocean Lila’), this CD is also a Meditative approach, great for Yoga class, massage, relaxation, and Meditation. Light percussion, water sounds, bells, and bamboo flutes.

…a beautifully transparent soundscape. ...a piece of music so serene and peaceful that it immediately takes you into a meditative space. ... a perfect compliment to any yoga practice.
[Jaime Ehrenfeld, Feb/March, 2004 Enlightened Practice Magazine]
Above the interplay of ... melodic percussion instruments the Chinese bamboo flute called the Dizi weaves a sinuous melody... perfect for relaxation, meditation, and Yoga.
[Regina Rodriguez, Jornal Olho de Aguia]

Water Drum (17:00)

Featuring the African Water Drums from Africa - two big half gourds filled with water and smaller half gourds floating on top that resonate a deep bass tone through the water when struck. I also play the Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute) in addition to Kalimba (African thumb piano), Shakers, Gonkogui (African metal bells), and Kanjira (a small hand drum from India). Michael Moses joins me on Bass Mbira (another name for thumb piano) and Metal plate.

Rain Trance I (17:09) and II (13:17)

Live thunder storm moving from a light sprinkle to thunder off in the distance back to a light shower, featuring the Egyptian Bamboo Flute and light percussion tracks combining Udu (African Clay Pot), and the Brazilian Berimbau.

Water Bells (18:39)

Very meditative, especially great for deep relaxation at the end of Yoga class. I’ve been using it in my Yoga classes for years. Featuring the relaxing sounds of Water dripping and a low deep Noah bell (brass bell from India) softly ringing as the overtone comes ringing through. In one of the first Yoga classes I ever played Live Sacred Music for I looped the bell with a mic and because I put the long narrow mic inside the bell (I wasn’t getting a strong enough signal) an overtone (a 10th for you musicians) came through as gentle feedback. It took a little experimenting to recreate the feedback loop in the studio but I love the result!

Inner Peace CD cover

Inner Peace (it’s up to us)

69:51

This CD largely focused on vocals and was born from the one song I’ve ever written with lyrics (the title track). Further, it was conceived as an opportunity to explore some new ways of singing Mantra like the a 3 part round on Gayatri Chorale, or the jazz Soprano Sax on Loka Samasta Sukhino Bhavantu, and the bridge of the title piece). I also explored combining vocals with my instruments on Drishti (Female vocals and Soprano Sax) and Sei Hei Ki (Chi Ku Re) (multi-layered Male vocals and Alto Flute). I was also fortunate to have 3 Tuvan throat style singers contribute their talents along with numerous female and male vocalists (noted below), some incredible instrumentalists (also noted below). Along the way the project became a community builder with 24 South Florida musicians and singers, many of them also Yoga teachers, Sound Healers and body workers contributed to this CD. We had over 100 people at the CD release party! A night to remember.

Peace Prayer 10:46

I played Bansuri as a meditation or prayer for Peace. Yoga teacher Luis Garcia joined me on Tambour along with Harpist Scott Marischen. I put a few of my Tibetan Bowls in to round out the textures.

Gayatri Chorale 12:31

Featuring Helena Redman and myself on vocals, this version of this much loved Mantra became more choral like as I explored the possibilities of making it a 3 part round during the recording process. Yoga teacher Aaron Erickson is on Tuvan Throat singing on this piece. In addition, as a framework for the piece, I employed a 12 beat pattern that comes from a Flamenco beat called Bulerias, which breaks down to 3+3+2+2+2. Harpist Scott Marischen holds down the pattern, but don’t expect it to feel like Flamenco! It’s more like being in sacred space somehow to me.

Inner Peace (its’ up to us) 6:54

The title track for this CD says it all really. Jill Burton blessed me by singing the lyrics with me. My talented friends Randy Bernsen joined in on guitar, Rajesh Bhandari on Tablas, and Yoga teacher Luis Garcia played violin, and I added the Udus (Clay pots), and Tibetan Bowls.

Tribal Dance 7:23

Featuring the Double Native American Indian Flute, and the Udu (clay pot) with vocals by Jill Burton and Tuvan throat singing combined with a little beat box influence by Structural Integrator Jaret Brooks.

Loka Samasta Sukhino Bhavantu 6:52

Featuring lead vocals by Yoga teacher Jen Rose and some modal jazz influenced Soprano Saxophone by Richard Brookens this piece also uses a chorus to sing a rhythmic chant joined by acoustic bass and violin under the Vedic chant.

Drishti 10:30

A musical experiment that turned out better than I could have hoped for. Helena Redman effortlessly followed my Soprano Sax lines over a multi-tiered drone created by Martha Spangler on Acoustic Bass.

Sei Hei Ki (Chi Ku Re) 14:50

This was an amazing experience to create this piece. David Jesse Kennet sang over my Tibetan Bowls in my studio and did four long takes. A few days later I went through and edited any obvious flaws in what had been an amazing afternoon of improvised vocals. After the coughs, outside noises and other unneeded sounds were cleaned out, I listened and realized the four tracks almost fit together perfectly! Another period of easy edits and everything was flowing nicely. I decided to see if combining my Alto Flute with the vocal lines would work and was convinced to play the next 5 hours finding the right place and sonorities to fit with what David had sung previously. Voila!

Lake Melva Meditation CD cover

Lake Melva Meditation

72:49

This CD is the first in what I call my Water Trilogy, great for Yoga class, massage, relaxation, and Meditation, and featuring bamboo flutes with sounds of water, nature, and other meditative sounds. 'Rain Trance' and 'Ocean Lila' (soon to be released in the fall of 2017) are the other two CDs in the Water Trilogy. I featured the Dizi (bamboo flute from China) and had my friend Russell Feingold play Didgeridoo (a low drone instrument from Australia) on Rainforest Cave. I also played the Dizi as a drone on Desert Oasis, using the Bansuri (bamboo flute from India) for the melody and then featured the Dizi again on Lake Melva.

The first song, 'Rainforest Cave' features Richard playing a dizi (Chinese bamboo flute), Indian brass bells, rainstick and chimes. He is accompanied on the song by Russel Feingold on didgeridoo. The album closes with 'Lake Melva' which... features various nature sounds which Richard recorded at Lake Melva: crickets, frogs, and the wind in the trees. LAKE MELVA MEDITATION is a rich listening experience and a superlative album. Outstanding!
[Bill Binkelman, Wind and Wire Magazine, New Instrumental Music and Interviews.]

Rainforest Cave 30:16

Featuring the Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute) and the Didgeridoo (Australian drone), and the sounds of dripping water in a cavern, this piece is just over 30 minutes. Russell Feingold (on the Didgeridoo) and I recorded our parts together in the studio. With no tempo, Russell got very creative and sometimes sounds more like a whale! I added the Noah Bells (Brass Bells from India), Rainstick, Water sounds and Chimes later.

The Dizi is a very unusual flute in that it has a membrane that buzzes, akin to a kazoo but with a much more refined sound. I chose the particular flute I play here out of a group of 30 of the same flutes. I found them all in a music store in San Francisco and spent most of the afternoon narrowing down the selection. It has a beautiful black lacquer finish with golden bands along the length and Jade on each end and unlike many bamboo flutes has a removable head joint for fine-tuning the pitch. In addition, etched on the side of the flute there is a poem in Chinese that tells the story of two lovers whose families have forbidden their love, so they meet behind a water fall in secret.

Desert Oasis 12:01

Over a looped drone from a Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute) I played the Bansuri (bamboo flute from India). The music of the great Duduk master Jivan Gasparian inspired me for this piece.

Lake Melva 30:32

I played the Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute) over the live-recorded sounds of frogs mating calls on this meditative piece.

When I was only out of high school a few years, my older brother invited me to a party at a lake in Richmond, VA. I brought my Soprano Sax and everyone was looking forward to me playing after a late lunch on the dock. After we ate, everyone was relaxing in the sun on a warm summer day. I walked down away from the dock and started playing. I noticed immediately that my sound was bouncing back to me from across the lake and so I started playing long slow phrase to build some harmonies. Just having fun with the echo effect. After about an hour, I went back to the dock to find everyone in the party asleep!

About 30 years later, I owned a house on a lake in Fort Lauderdale called Lake Melva. One night I could hardly believe how musical the frogs were as they sang their mating songs. There must have been thousands of them on the mile long lake. I lived at the end of the lake on the West side so the sound would really move from that perspective, usually in a circular fashion around the lake. Closer, farther, to the right and then the left, the sound moved in all directions eventually.

I was compelled to set up my digital recorder and I managed to record 3 minutes of completely clean sounds of nature. Besides the symphony of the frogs, you can hear the wind rustling the trees and crickets talking to each other, maybe complaining about the volume of the frogs? I took the recording into Balsam Pillow Recording Studio, and after looping the sounds of the lake to make a 30-minute piece, with my brother’s party in mind created the echo effect as I played the bamboo flute for 'Lake Melva'.

Some people have commented they love to listen to this piece with headphones to hear the movement of sound from the frogs! Not recommended for listening while driving!

bamboo dynasty CD cover

bamboo dynasty

51:40

This was my first CD of original music using instruments from all over the world, combining new sounds and rhythms and using them in ways that appealed to my ears. 1997 and I was just finishing the cover as I moved to San Francisco for two months. I began studies that summer at the Ali Akbar College of Indian Music in San Rafael. The cover of this CD was a painting by Bill Swanson, one of the artists I lived with in a group house in what was called the Mission District (before the dot com move in). I commuted several days a week to the school, and one day a week to Berklee for Tabla lessons, practicing as much as I could find time for. Check 'Svadharma' for what came out of that trip musically.

On this CD I play bamboo flutes from India (Segatanrias, Bamboo) and China (Just Visiting, Botswana Waltz), Alto Flute (Ablution), and Soprano Saxophone on Armenia.

I also have a love of syncopation (I am a jazz player after all!) and with Flamenco Rhythms in 12/8 (Segatanrias), Rhythms in 10/4 (Armenia), Rhythms in 6/4 (Just Visiting), Palindromic Rhythms in 14/4 (Botswana Waltz), and exploring free Rubato time (Ablution).

In a dramatic change from his other album I have heard, the sublime and reflective LAKE MELVA MEDITATION, this rlease from YELLOW BELL is brimming with sensual world fusion rhythms and snaky melodies. This is truly wonderful world fusion music as it embraces the real meaning of fusion. Completely disparate elements come together to form a cohesive soundscape that blends primal instincts and futuristic visions.

[Bill Binkelman, Wind and Wire Magazine, New Instrumental Music and Interviews.]

Segatanrias 4:37

The inspiration for this piece came from my work playing Flutes, Saxophones, Bass Clarinet, and Tablas with Flamenco dance groups. My western ears always required me to "translate" these Flamenco rhythms so that I could comprehend and play them more easily. I understand real Flamenco musicians play Bulerias starting on 12 but my ears and head won’t go there so for me it’s the first downbeat.

For this piece I decided to use several rhythms from Flamenco Dance and music that can all be subdivided into 12 parts. I start with Segadillas. My version of this rhythm subdivides it into 3+2+3+2+2. Then I transition to a Tangos rhythm that is usually organized into an even number of bars with 4 beats per bar. I wanted to keep the groupings of 12 so that meant a 3 bar phrase. Next I moved into a Bulerias, subdivided into 3+3+2+2+2. I was lucky to have such experienced and knowledgeable Flamenco dancers as Damaris Ferrer and Leah Austin record some footwork and Palma's (intricate hand clapping) for the piece also. I added the drone for the piece by playing a harmonica with some of the holes covered with tape.

Armenia 9:25

Employing a Rubato introduction and then a two measure bass ostinato in 10/4, this piece features Soprano Saxophone playing a mysteriously lush and angular melody.

Just Visiting 8:45

This piece features the Dizi (bamboo lute from China) and is in 6/4. Pairing the flute with Guitar by Fred Hsia made the piece come alive for me.

Botswana Waltz 16:07

A piece that developed from my experiments with Palindromic time signatures, ultimately counting it in quarter notes grouped in a pattern of 4+3+3+4. In the middle of the piece we pull off a little slight of hand and taking the dotted quarter note from the original tempo and make it a triplet where the triplet becomes the new pulse, staying with the 4+3+3+4 grouping. Theoretically (hey, why not?) you could think of it also as 14x3/8 or 56/8 but that gets very heavy to carry very quickly so let’s not dwell on that. A low pitched set of Tablas comes in to establish the new feel and Nicky Yarling steps up to improvise (scat) a great vocal solo. Soon, the Dizi returns and the piece also returns to the original feel.

Ablution 9:42

Originally composed for a modern dance piece and performed using a synthesized recorded sequence and live Alto Flute, I replaced many of the tracks on the sequence with live instruments in the studio. The name of the piece reflected the action of he dance - a ceremonial act of washing or cleansing.

Bamboo 2:48

A light hearted piece featuring the Bansuri (bamboo flute from India), Udu ( African clay pot), and shaker. I created several ostinato flute lines to improvise over.

Empty Mind CD cover

The Empty Mind

Essentially a compilation or Sound Track CD, containing excerpts of pieces from six Yellow Bell CDS that were used for the sound track of the documentary 'The Empty Mind'. We did a live performance at the showing of the film and later found out it won best Florida Film that year. As a documentary that was quite surprising and appreciated of course.

If you have yet to experience Yellow Bell's music this would be a great introduction to an emerging catalogue of fine spiritually engaging acoustic music for the discerning ear.
[Enlightened Practice Magazine, JR Lakini Ehrenfeld]

Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo 3:17

Originally released on the 'Sa Ta Na Ma' CD. In Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan's 3HO, 'Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo' is one of the most powerful mantras. It is used to tune in to your higher self - usually before meditation. 'Ong' - the Creator, 'Namo' - a reverent greeting, 'Guru' - one who enlightens, and 'Dev' - non-physical. The phrase recognizes God, Guru, and the teacher within. Amit Chaterjee sent tingles up our spines when he improvised the lead vocal in the studio. He also added his talents on Sitar that day.

Botswana Waltz 6:08

Originally issued on 'bamboo dynasty', this is a musical rhythmic puzzle. I use the Dizi (bamboo flute from China) on this piece. The cut here is an excerpt. The original cut is 16:07 . This is a type of mirror composition or palindromic piece I have fallen in love with and actually led me to study Indian Ragas as the rhythmic concepts and the free beginning have correlations in that music. The rhythmic cycle is in 14 divided into 4 + 3 + 3 + 4.

Bar-Bar-A 4:31

Originally released on 'Svadharma', I played two tabla drums instead of the usual pair of Tabla and Bayan, and used some large Indian Brass bells, scraping and striking them to round out the percussion sound. The melody on bamboo flute had been improvised one night at a session and then developed later. Amit Chaterjee added his talents on Sitar.

Yellow Bell Pop 1:17

Originally released on 'Svadharma', another piece from the original Yellow Bell sessions. When I originally composed this piece, this was an intro played on Alto flute while breathing lightly and popping the keys. The full melody with chord changes has still not been recorded.

Ablution 9:42

Originally issued on 'bamboo dynasty', this was a piece that choreographer Damaris Ferrer asked me to do for her modern dance piece 'Ablution'. I improvised the basic tracks for this piece on my Korg O1W at one of the rehearsals with the dancers, then went home and 'dressed it up'. I performed on Alto Flute with the sequence and the dancers live quite a few times. Before I issued it I replaced quite a bit of the sequence with live cymbals, gongs and chimes and a few hand drums.

Egyptian Moon 7:51

I played the Egyptian bamboo flute and used a harmonica for the drone, approximating a harmonium for this flute meditation.

‘Five’ 4:10

Originally released on ‘Svadharma, percussionist Michael Moses and I had found this sonority using the Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute), the Wah-Wah bells, and his double Ocarina on the 'Riversticks / Ferryman's Release' CD (available on www.yellowbellmusic.com). I wanted a chance to develop that combination of sounds and the day of the Yellow bell session Michael, playing the Afro Cuban Bata drums proposed doing something in 5/4, hence the title of the piece.

Water Drum 7:06

Originally released on 'Rain Trance', featuring the African Water Drums from Africa, two big gourds filled with water and smaller gourds floating on top that resonate a deep bass tone through the water when struck. I also play the Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute) in addition to Kalimba (African thumb piano), Shakers, Gonkogui (African metal bells), and Kanjira (a small hand drum from India). Michael Moses joins me on Bass Mbira (another name for thumb piano) and Metal plate.

Desert Oasis 9:45

Originally released on 'Lake Melva Meditation' I used a Dizi (Chinese bamboo flute) to provide a drone for the Bansuri (bamboo flute from India). The simplicity and transparency of using only the two flutes provides a direct connection to the meditative mind.

Mushin 6:07

This piece was composed for Filmmaker Jon Braely's documentary The Empty Mind. He used 11 other cuts from five Yellow Bell CD's for the soundtrack. The film won 'Best Florida Film' in the 2004 Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival (FlIFF). This twelfth piece features me on the Dizi (Chinese bamboo) flute, Clay Pot, Shekere, and Indian Brass Bells.

Rain Forest Cave 7:00

Originally released on 'Lake Melva Meditation' the sound of the Australian Didgeridoo provides a background of long rolling tones while the bamboo flute from China (Dizi) weaves in and out of the natural sounds of rain falling in the distance in addition to water drops falling into a nearby pool. This is an excerpt - the original release is 30:16 long (available on the CD at www.yellowbellmusic.com).

Water Bells 4:30

Originally released on 'RainTrance', very meditative and great for deep relaxation. I’ve been using it in my Yoga classes for years during deep relaxation. This piece features Water dripping and a low deep Noah bell (brass bell from India) softly ringing as the overtone comes ringing through. In one of the first Yoga classes I ever played Live Sacred Music for I looped the bell with a mic and because I put the long narrow mic inside the bell (I wasn’t getting a strong enough signal) an overtone (a 10th for you musicians) came through as gentle feedback. It took a little experimenting to recreate the feedback loop in the studio but I love the result!